Posted by: KSPH IT

Glaucoma! The second cause of blindness and importantly: it’s irreversible.

Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of blindness for people over the age of 60. It can occur at any age but is more common in older adults.

Many forms of glaucoma have no warning signs. The effect is so gradual that you may not notice a change in vision until the condition is at an advanced stage.

Because vision loss due to glaucoma can’t be recovered, it’s important to have regular eye exams that include measurements of your eye pressure so a diagnosis can be made in its early stages and treated appropriately. If glaucoma is recognized early, vision loss can be slowed or prevented.

Symptoms

The signs and symptoms of glaucoma vary depending on the type and stage of your condition. For example:

Open-angle glaucoma

Patchy blind spots in your side (peripheral) or central vision, frequently in both eyes

Tunnel vision in the advanced stages

Acute angle-closure glaucoma

Severe headache

Eye pain

Nausea and vomiting

Blurred vision

Halos around lights

Eye redness

Causes

Glaucoma is the result of damage to the optic nerve. As this nerve gradually deteriorates, blind spots develop in your visual field. For reasons that doctors don’t fully understand, this nerve damage is usually related to increased pressure in the eye.

Elevated eye pressure is due to a buildup of a fluid (aqueous humor) that flows throughout the inside of your eye. This internal fluid normally drains out through a tissue called the trabecular meshwork at the angle where the iris and cornea meet. When fluid is overproduced or the drainage system doesn’t work properly, the fluid can’t flow out at its normal rate and eye pressure increases.

Glaucoma tends to run in families. In some people, scientists have identified genes related to high eye pressure and optic nerve damage.

Types of glaucoma include:

Open-angle glaucoma

Open-angle glaucoma is the most common form of the disease. The drainage angle formed by the cornea and iris remains open, but the trabecular meshwork is partially blocked. This causes pressure in the eye to gradually increase. This pressure damages the optic nerve. It happens so slowly that you may lose vision before you’re even aware of a problem.

Angle-closure glaucoma

Angle-closure glaucoma, also called closed-angle glaucoma, occurs when the iris bulges forward to narrow or block the drainage angle formed by the cornea and iris. As a result, fluid can’t circulate through the eye and pressure increases. Some people have narrow drainage angles, putting them at increased risk of angle-closure glaucoma.

Angle-closure glaucoma may occur suddenly (acute angle-closure glaucoma) or gradually (chronic angle-closure glaucoma). Acute angle-closure glaucoma is a medical emergency.

Glaucoma in children

It’s possible for infants and children to have glaucoma. It may be present from birth or develop in the first few years of life. The optic nerve damage may be caused by drainage blockages or an underlying medical condition.

Prevention

These self-care steps can help you detect glaucoma in its early stages, which is important in preventing vision loss or slowing its progress.

Get regular dilated eye examinations. Regular comprehensive eye exams can help detect glaucoma in its early stages, before significant damage occurs. As a general rule, the American Academy of Ophthalmology recommends having a comprehensive eye exam every five to 10 years if you’re under 40 years old; every two to four years if you’re 40 to 54 years old; every one to three years if you’re 55 to 64 years old; and every one to two years if you’re older than 65. If you’re at risk of glaucoma, you’ll need more frequent screening. Ask your doctor to recommend the right screening schedule for you.

Know your family’s eye health history. Glaucoma tends to run in families. If you’re at increased risk, you may need more frequent screening.

Exercise safely. Regular, moderate exercise may help prevent glaucoma by reducing eye pressure. Talk with your doctor about an appropriate exercise program.

Take prescribed eyedrops regularly. Glaucoma eyedrops can significantly reduce the risk that high eye pressure will progress to glaucoma. To be effective, eyedrops prescribed by your doctor need to be used regularly even if you have no symptoms.

Wear eye protection. Serious eye injuries can lead to glaucoma. Wear eye protection when using power tools or playing high-speed racket sports in enclosed courts.

 

Message from our director

The School that takes the “Sting out of Disability”. We believe that every human being has limitations (challenges, weakness, handicaps, name it) and we all have strengths / abilities. KSPH, believes in the “Abilities”. We are just “Differently Abled.” Many years ago, at his graduation ceremony, Fred Semakula, an all round, successful officer working with Motivation Freedom Through Mobility, said “KSPH gave me a chance to live”. Honorable Buwendo Murshid, testifying at the recent UN day celebration, held at the School, said, “KSPH made me what I am today”. Such and many other success stories are the reason I am grateful to God for the opportunity to be part of the life changing process of these very special, lovely children. Even when someone was about to give up, such comments and stories are a motivation to carry on, and give it your best. We will always treasure the founder members, for a vision well set. The many individuals and organizations that have contributed, in the last 48years to the different areas and programs of the School. My predecessors, on whose foundation we have continued to build. The amazing Governance, staff and volunteer teams, serving with us. Best of all, to our dear pupils and old students, who have made our working life, a memorable experience. On behalf of the Management Board and parents, please accept our gratitude and appreciation. We look to the years ahead with open minds and hearts, on how best we can serve these children; KSPH desires to be a model to others, who want to develop such services country wide, so that Children with Disabilities all over Uganda get easier access to functional, quality Education. We need to remember that Identifying disability is not for labeling, but for curving out, and directing on the best way for the abilities within to excel. Together, let’s make the world a better place for all the stay.
God bless you.

Mrs. Mwesigwa Joy - School director